Coming MIRACLE MONDAY 2017! Superman Through the Ages



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The Origin of Superman    ONLINE COMICS!    SUPERMAN in the...
1930s  |  1940s Part 1  |  1940s Part 2  |  1950s Part 1  |  1950s Part 2
1960s Part 1  |  1960s Part 2  |  1960s Part 3  |  1960s Part 4  |  1960s Part 5
1970s Part 1  |  1970s Part 2  |  1970s Part 3  |  1970s Part 4
1980s Part 1  |  1980s Part 2  |  1980s Part 3  |  1980s Part 4  |  1980s Part 5
1990s Part 1  |  1990s Part 2  |  1990s Part 3  |  2000s  |  2010s
"Super Adventures" | "Untold Tales of Krypton" | "Operation Super-Sons"
Selections | Fan Fiction | Batman Part 1 | Batman Part 2 | Links
Metropolis Mailbag | "The Origins of Superman"                 About the Comics 
metropolis mailbag letters from - Jan/Feb 2004; 2003; 2002; 2001


Date: Thu, 27 Dec 2001 21:46:18 EST
From: DURAHNT
To: Metropolis Mailbag

The "Superman Comes to Earth" story was a nice reworking (or pre-working, perhaps?) of the Action Comics # 1 plot.  I like the touch that it was Superman's mother who actually first came up with the idea of going spaceward as a way of averting Krypton's destruction.  Jor-L devised the plan that saved Kal-L's life, all because his mother had thought to... "look, up in the sky."

And that's quite a cliffhanger you left us with on the last page!  For all its familiarity, this newspaper version of Superman's first story has some "new" and different twists to it.  Right after the famous car-smashing scene, poor Lois is now falling out of a plane...and I want to know what happens next!  Can you print some more pages from this story sometime?  I'd love to read the rest of it.  And thanks again for printing this newspaper plot, in which a well-known adventure can be appreciated in a brand-new way.

Best,

Durahn Taylor

You're very welcome, Durahn! 

Your comments are very insightful - the first few weeks of this story were originally written and drawn by Siegel and Shuster in 1933 or 1934 - years before Action Comics was published.  This was the strip that they were originally trying to sell.  It wasn't until 1938 that DC bought the piece from them, and they cut-and-pasted it into the story that appeared in Action Comics #1.  You can read more about this here and here.

The tale continues in two volumes of collected daily strips available from amazon (volume one and volume two).


Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 07:24:18 -0800
From: Mark Jones
To: Metropolis Mailbag

I remember reading that when I was a kid.  Thanks, I enjoyed it!
- Mark (I'm 52 now)


Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 21:22:35 +1100
From: darmar
To: Metropolis Mailbag

I'm a student, and found this site to be one of the best out of all the sites I had looked through.  The pictures are great and they were perfect for my major work that I recently have to complete.  Keep up the GREAT WORK!

Pryer


Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2001 22:23:14 -0700
From: Paul Wright
To: Metropolis Mailbag

I thought that Brainiac had a HUGE cranium yet the depiction that I see of him on the web site is basically the same as a normal human.  Is it possible that the original illustration looked so misshapen or am I thinking of a different supervillian?  Thank you in advance if you can help.

Perhaps you're remembering Brainiac's later incarnation as a robot, in which he had a huge cranium?


Date: Mon, 8 Oct 2001 19:58:26 +1000
From: tony
To: Metropolis Mailbag

It was great!  Brought back all my memories of Superman comics in the 1960s as a kid.

If only I had kept all those comics!!!


Date: Thu, 27 Sep 2001 15:06:25 -0400
From: Stephen Petrillo
To: Metropolis Mailbag

What can I say?  The website is fantastic.  In every way it transports those of us who are fans of the 1960s era SUPERMAN comics, SUPERBOY comics, and related titles right back to our childhood.  As one who today sits in a corner office adorned with SUPERMAN nostalgia, I am sure glad I found you.


Date: Thu, 20 Sep 2001 03:03:00 EDT
From: RRobot34
To: Metropolis Mailbag

Dear Editor,

I wish the Superman of the 60's were back.  We need a little bit more of that Superman for today's world.  I wish that style of comic story telling were back.  I love the old comics and wish these classics were available on CD Rom like Mad Magazine did a few years back with it's first 500 issues.  If there is any old comics that should be on CD ROM it should be Superman.  Even one for a special color e book format would be neat.


Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 00:14:13 -0400
From: PatCal
To: Metropolis Mailbag

What a wonderful idea to make some of the truly classic Superman stories available online.  The whole Fortress site is a real treat.
Thanks!


Date: Sat, 8 Sep 2001 08:37:48 -0700
From: Joshua Geren SA
To: Metropolis Mailbag

Hello there.

So nice to take a trip back to the days of yore when he was SUPERman and not SuperMAN.  The bits with the fortress were great.  Why can't we still have super science in comics today?

Ah, youth.


Date: Thu, 6 Sep 2001 17:37:53 EDT
From: WingedTygr
To: Metropolis Mailbag

I've just recently discovered the Fortress.  I'm having the time of my life reading tales of Superman that were published before I was born.  Like an old radio program, it gives me a "next installment" to look forward to every day after work.

Thanks All!


Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2001 23:43:04 -0400
From: David MacPhee
To: Metropolis Mailbag

What a fantastic idea!  I have a lot of these comics but am afraid to touch them.  This is much better.  It's great to have all this beautiful retro art and fantasy at my fingertips!  I love Curt Swan!


Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2001 22:55:55 -0500
From: chuck, michelle & the cat
To: Metropolis Mailbag

I always love reading those old Superman and Superboy stories, heck i think i have this one somewhere in the closet. brings back great memories.

thanks,
chuck


Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2001 20:13:23 EDT
From: Azamodeen
To: Metropolis Mailbag

I read this book a looong time ago - i'm a superman fan from way back.  Prior to the '91 recession it was part of my huge collection, but those days are long gone.  Now, thanks to you guys, it lives on in HYPER-NET-TIME!

THANKS GUYS this is a love to read again and again and again...


Date: Fri, 27 Jul 2001 22:21:53 -0400
From: Barry Freiman
To: Metropolis Mailbag

Wow - good stuff!


Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 14:49:11 -0500
From: Rufus T
To: Metropolis Mailbag

THANK YOU SO VERY MUCH!!!  I've been scouring rare and used book stores for copies of the old SUPERMAN comics I grew up reading, and was just shocked to find an entire story at this site! (I SWEAR it wasn't here the last time I looked!)

Thank you for putting it up, and please keep up the great work!


Date: Mon, 2 Jul 2001 18:36:27 EDT
From: Pmcartney4
To: Metropolis Mailbag
Subject: Who Took the Super Out of Superman?

The story was great, I read it in the 70s and want to see the rest of the special edition!


Date: Thu, 28 Jun 2001 09:30:22 -0400
From: Charles
To: Metropolis Mailbag
Subject: Luthor, Master of Evil
A true classic!

It's all here.  Superman saves Lois from: 1.) The elements; 2.) Evil henchmen; 3.) Luthor.

Remember when that used to happen EVERY time?

- Charlie


Date: Wed, 27 Jun 2001 23:50:56 -0400
From: Derek
To: Metropolis Mailbag
Subject: The Champion of All that is Fine and Good!
Dear Superman,

"Luthor, Master of Evil" was the best Superman story published in recent memory.  Gone all the doubt.  Gone all the worry.  Gone all the regret and helplessness and squeamish fears.

The art is very readable.  The characters' expressions and poses are evocative, letting the reader understand their emotions and movements from moment to moment.  The action sequences are well paced and laid-out, especially when they involve the outlandish gadgets that the story calls for.  For instance, seeing the pieces of the humongous press flying apart (page 8, panel 10) captures beautifully Superman's hidden strength.  Another loving detail was the depiction of Superman's hand as it snapped the bullet to dust (page 6, panel 8).  That hand was really nicely drawn and gave the story a tangibility often lost on lesser artists (or is it styles).

And the story!

In this story, everything is where it belongs.  Lois is fearless, Luthor is dastardly, and Superman is polite, wily, and invincible, in short, a hero.

An unusual and amusing touch was seeing that Clark wears his yellow belt as part of his suit (see page 1, panel 5).

I love the scientifictional devices like the hurricane generator/shield and the amphibious dirigible.  These are trademark Luthor inventions - wildly powerful, incredibly useful, powerless to stop the Action Ace.

Luthor is a wonderfully credible villain, a "sinister ultra-scientist" with a vast organization of fellow criminals and mastermind of a thousand crooked schemes.  His keen efficiency and intense ingenuity make him capable of taking the life of any ordinaryperson (or extraordinary person; example, Lois), but for the fact of Superman. Even there, his plot for Superman seems airtight as the trap snaps shut.  But Superman is courteous and inevitable (and we get him showing off his staggering scientific know-how too, talking about the "specially treated material, that [he himself] invented").

Thus evil takes it on the jaw but, due to Superman's heroic nature ("it's more than [Luthor] deserve[s]"), lives on to almost-but-not-quite-succeed-in-his-plot-for-the-destruction-of-Superman-and-world-domination another day.

Everything ends up right.  Lois gets her scoop.  Luthor ends up in jail for his crimes, and out of it again through sheer genius.  And Superman gets a nice acid bath.

What a story!

When are those-who-control at Detective Comics, Inc. going to put this Siegel and Shuster on the regular books and quit it with this heaping of tragedy upon tragedy upon a poor lost soul?

Much gratitude goes to Superman Through The Ages! for bringing this story to the world once again.

- Derek


Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2001 13:03:54 -0700
From: Yolanda
To: Metropolis Mailbag
Subject: Superwoman
I just wanted to know if the "S" emblem on Superwoman's costume is exactly the same shape as Superman's?  In the story, sometimes it looks a bit longer or taller.  And if they are different, where can I get a nice clean copy of the emblem?

Thanks
- Yollie

The Superwoman character was created for many reasons, one of which was copyright purposes.  The intent was to have the name "Superwoman" identified with the rest of the Superman family.  So her emblem was supposed to be identical to Superman's - any difference in appearance that you may see is probably due to a variation in art style.

metropolis mailbag letters from - Jan/Feb 2004; 2003; 2002; 2001

  METROPOLIS MAILBAG   SMALLVILLE MAILSACK   COMMENTS FOR KRYPTO   STTA GUESTBOOK   THE AMERICAN WAY  

The Origin of Superman    ONLINE COMICS!    SUPERMAN in the...
1930s  |  1940s Part 1  |  1940s Part 2  |  1950s Part 1  |  1950s Part 2
1960s Part 1  |  1960s Part 2  |  1960s Part 3  |  1960s Part 4  |  1960s Part 5
1970s Part 1  |  1970s Part 2  |  1970s Part 3  |  1970s Part 4
1980s Part 1  |  1980s Part 2  |  1980s Part 3  |  1980s Part 4  |  1980s Part 5
1990s Part 1  |  1990s Part 2  |  1990s Part 3  |  2000s  |  2010s
"Super Adventures" | "Untold Tales of Krypton" | "Operation Super-Sons"
Selections | Fan Fiction | Batman Part 1 | Batman Part 2 | Links
Metropolis Mailbag | "The Origins of Superman"                 About the Comics 
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Superman created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster
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